Pop up cemetery tour returns Oct. 12

Pop up cemetery tour returns Oct. 12



Halloween-themed cemetery tours abound this time of year, but none is quite like the free pop up tour produced by members of Berlin Historical Society on the lawn of the Worthington Meeting House at 723 Worthington Ridge.

Town Clerk Arthur Woodruff and his wife, Louise, were neighbors of the meeting house during its days as Worthington School. Some folks report visions of Arthur in a proper suit, riding his bicycle to work at the old town hall a block away.

Prudence Punderson Rossiter, who lived nearby, is eager to tell her story. It could well be the subject of a mini-series costume drama. Her legacy is an embroidered self portrait now worth $1 million.

We’ll see “Aunt Abby” Pattison, whose great grandfather and uncle brought the tin industry to Berlin from Ireland in 1740. She lived a life taking care of others and died falling down stairs holding her cat.

These spirits and others will tell their stories on Saturday, Oct. 12. Tours take place at 1, 1:30, 2 and 2:30 p.m. and are limited to 10 participants per tour. The rain date is Saturday, Oct. 19.

The unique event extends from the Meeting House front lawn to the garden and green space behind it at Berlin Historical’s 1771 House.

The pop up cemetery is so named because faux gravestones – replications of brownstone, granite and marble monuments found in our town cemeteries – will be set up.

At the end of the tour, refreshments, and Berlin-themed goods will be available for purchase. Also, the 1771 House will be open for guests to view the restored front room and library.

To register for the pop up cemetery tour, call Nancy Moran at 860-416-1568 or email nanmoran@gmail.com with your name, contact information and number attending. Note, the lawn area is uneven and sensible shoes are recommended.

-- Press Release


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