OUT & ABOUT: 5 things to know about the Trail of Terror, Lake Compounce Haunted Graveyard, and other area haunts

OUT & ABOUT: 5 things to know about the Trail of Terror, Lake Compounce Haunted Graveyard, and other area haunts



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Halloween is just around the corner, and the Record-Journal visited a few popular haunts in the area for a behind-the-scenes look.

From frightening forests to an evil house, here are five things to know about area haunted attractions.

Trail of Terror

For over two decades, visitors have been coming from over 20 states to brave the Trail of Terror in Wallingford.

This year’s theme takes inspiration from phobias as well as classic Hollywood horror movies.

“There’s fear of darkness, fear of the woods,” said Wayne Barneschi, owner and founder of the seasonal attraction.

A total of 37 scenes make up the nearly hour-long maze that takes guests through the woods.

More than 300 actors and volunteers participate.

Typical store-bought Halloween decorations are rarely used. Barneschi said old items give the trail a vintage vibe.

The trail is open Fridays and Saturdays from 7 to 11 p.m. and Sundays until 10 p.m. The last night the trail is open is Sunday, Oct. 28. 

General admission tickets start at $15.

Haunted Graveyard

In its 19th year, The Haunted Graveyard at Lake Compounce in Bristol is bringing more scares with 14 themed houses and more than 200 vampires, ghouls, witches and other creatures of the night in full makeup.

“It’s always cool when people are just waiting in line and they’re super scared and we thrive off of that because our job is to make people as scared as possible with our monsters,” makeup artist Christina Klanchich said.

The 45-minute walk brings guests from catacombs to a cemetery, through a vampire house, into woods and down to a zombie hospital.

The graveyard is open weekends in October starting at 5 p.m. The last night will be Sunday, Oct. 28.

General admission tickets (not including park rides) are $29.99 or $27.99 for advance reservations for 25 people of more.

Evidence of Evil

What started as an escape room called The Chamber last year has evolved into a satanic-theme haunted house behind Crystal Bees in Southington.

“We’re trying to change the way people experience haunted houses,” said Bobby Besaw, co-owner of Evidence of Evil production company.

Guests who walk through the rooms in the house become part of the haunted experience.

Over a dozen actors will scare guests and pull them into the storyline of a house taken over by evil spirits.

The haunt starts at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights in October, and the last night is Sunday, Oct. 28.

General admission tickets are $20.

Haunt on Eden

From their front yard to a complete haunted house and village structure in the Mount Southington ski area, the Donis family is cranking up the scares this year.

“This year’s our biggest year, our first year going pro,” said Jeff Donis, owner and founder of Haunt on Eden along with his wife Susan.

“Even though it’s year six it’s a lot like starting over, it’s a whole different ball game,” she added.

The concept is a spooky village that leads to an even scarier haunted house.

Over 20 actors will make sure guests are truly spooked, including the Donis’ two daughters who will play ax-wielding sisters.

The haunt is open Fridays and Saturdays from 7 until 10 p.m., up to Nov. 4.

General admission tickets are $18

Other areahaunted attractions

Creeperum, 41 Marne St., Hamden

The Haunted Isle, 17 River St., East Haven

Rails to the Darkside, 58 North Road., East Windsor

Nightmare Acres, 240 Governors Highway, South Windsor

Nightmare on Wolcott Street, 1058 Wolcott St., Waterbury

Legends of Fear, 2 Saw Mill City Road., Shelton

Dark Manor, 25 Main St., Baltic

akus@record-journal.com
203-317-2448
Twitter: @KusReporter


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