Data breach affected thousands, including Wallingford students

Data breach affected thousands, including Wallingford students



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WALLINGFORD — A recently disclosed data breach that left student information exposed wasn’t confined to the local school district.

On Thursday, Assistant School Superintendent Danielle Bellizzi informed parents by email that Pearson Clinical Assessment had notified the school district Tuesday about a “security incident ” affecting a tool that the school district had used to track student reading and math assessments.

The exposed data was isolated to first names, last names, and in some instances may have included date of birth or email address. 

Scott Overland, Pearson media relations director, said via email Friday that data from approximately 13,000 school and university accounts with Pearson had been affected. The total number of students who had personal data exposed has not been determined.

In Wallingford, Bellizzi said “a limited number” of students were exposed.

Bellizzi did not return a call for comment Friday.

School Superintendent Salvatore Menzo, who is chaperoning a school trip to Australia, said via email Friday that school administrators are “working diligently to address the situation and to contact impacted individuals.”

“We will continue to monitor the situation to ensure data privacy and security,” he said.

Pearson is providing credit-monitoring services to students through Experian at no cost.

Overland said that the company, which school districts nationwide use for assessment services, “found and fixed the vulnerability.”

"While we have no evidence that this information has been misused, we have notified the affected customers as a precaution,” he said. “Protecting our customers’ information is of critical importance to us.”

LTakores@record-journal.com
203-317-2212
Twitter: @LCTakores


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