EDITORIAL: Keep funding the Daffodil Festival

EDITORIAL: Keep funding the Daffodil Festival



If there’s one thing you can count on it’s the unpredictability of New England weather. This is particularly true when it comes to the changing of the seasons, and it’s always been one of the major x-factors when it comes to Meriden’s Daffodil Festival.

There have been Daffodil Festival weekends that have been all but washed out. There have been Daffodil Festivals that have gloried in early spring sunshine. There have been Daffodil Festivals that have had both rain and shine. There have been Daffodil Festivals that have seen daffodils in full bloom, and festivals when the daffodils have been not so great.

As we say in New England: if you don’t like the weather, wait a minute.

We could say the unpredictability is part of the charm, just like spring itself. It’s part of life in New England, and Meriden’s early spring celebration has become a fixture in New England life.

This is not to say that city councilors can be blamed for finding reason to worry about festival finances. A washed-out festival can seem like a money waster. So, it does not come as a surprise that after another year of below-average turnout because of bad weather, some councilors are calling to spend less on festival staffing.

Republican Dan Brunet made a motion recently to reduce the funding, from about $86,000 to about $66,000, saying police and fire staffing was excessive considering the turnout. Other councilors agreed, but not enough to make a change. Brunet’s proposal was ultimately rejected.

It’s hard not to agree with the concerns raised by Brunet. 

But, rather than get into an argument about it, we would offer a simple observation: the Daffodil Festival is special.

So special that it’s worth preparing for the great turnout that cooperation by Mother Nature will bring.

“If the weather was perfect this weekend and we had 100,000 people come through, I think the tenor of the room would be different,” observed City Councilor Brian Daniels during the discussion.

That’s the prevailing point of view. As long as Meriden considers the Daffodil Festival its flagship event, which is what it should, funding needs to prepare for the best. 

 


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