LETTERS: UConn football, Trump and endangered species, Meriden public works

LETTERS: UConn football, Trump and endangered species, Meriden public works



Save UConn football

Editor:

Some fans are excited with UConn’s return to the Big East. Some aren’t. I can assure you of this: if Connecticut administrators de-emphasize UConn football, UConn won’t be a renowned major university in the future.

Football is a great American sport but it’s a contact sport. Traumatic injuries can occur, but to my knowledge, UConn hasn’t had any in the modern era. Parents have to decide if the benefits outweigh the risks. With increased safety development in football gear and by administrators in rules, there may be better safety in the future. Only time will tell.

The University of New Haven was successful before it dropped football. It reinstated it and it has been a success. I don’t think that could happen if UConn dropped football. Connecticut administrators say they won’t de-emphasize UConn football but things could change. I predict that we may have seven seasons to turn things around.

For parents of star Connecticut high school football players, I hope you will encourage your sons to investigate UConn. Sending them to schools with 100,000 seat stadiums may not be a wise move.

I don’t want future generations not to enjoy college football, high school football, prep school football, or youth football. 

I beg you all to support UConn football. On UConn’s Pro Day NFL scouts observe UConn players when they are draftable prospects, so you can get to the NFL from there.

In good weather, attend UConn football games. I don’t expect you to attend in cold, raw, wet weather, but attending games can be enjoyable, tailgating, athletic events. If my friends and I had our way, we’d have a domed, all-purpose facility.

When I was younger, I tried to excel, partly so younger folk could learn and play the right way.

Please help save UConn football.

Ben Grzyb, Manchester

The Trump Extinction Plan

Editor:

The Trump Administration just finalized regulations to dramatically weaken the Endangered Species Act — our most effective law for protecting wildlife in danger of extinction. Since President Nixon signed the law in 1973, hundreds of species have been saved from disappearing forever, including our national symbol — the bald eagle.

But the Trump Extinction Plan weakens endangered species protections by making it harder to protect species listed as threatened, delaying lifesaving action until a species' population is so small it may be impossible to save. These news rules also exempt climate change from key parts of the law, making it more difficult to protect the polar bear and many other imperiled species that are impacted by the effects of climate change. Finally, the new rules make it easier for companies to build roads, pipelines, mines, and other industrial projects in areas of critical habitat that are essential to imperiled species' survival.

The Trump Extinction Plan was drafted by former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and current Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, both of whom are tied to industry lobbyists and plagued by ethics scandals. Please contact our senators and urge them to overturn the Trump Endangered Species rules.

Sara Waller, Meriden

Thank you, Meriden

Editor:

On one of our many trips driving towards Wallingford on the lower part of South Curtis Street this past Friday, we noticed a city truck and two city workers cleaning up the trash. This stretch of road has been a mess lately with all sorts of bottles, cans, plastic containers and just unwanted debris. Why people think it’s OK to fling unwanted things on the side of roads, I’ll never understand. This section of road is so natural and pretty, especially as the leaves turn. So, thank you, City of Meriden, for cleaning up this mess. Let’s hope it stays litter free for awhile.

Sue Mattingly, Meriden


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