LETTERS: Wallingford needs new ideas

LETTERS: Wallingford needs new ideas



Be open to new ideas

Editor:

As a retired Information Technology executive I have spent my entire career in the business world looking at different ways of doing things to remain competitive or gain an edge on the competition. The worst thing I could ever hear from someone is "we've always done it this way. This letter will not address the longstanding debate about the use of technology in Wallingford but will address concerns I have about questioning "how things are being done" based on a recent letter and column in the Record-Journal. In the business world, there is a constant need to look at improving upon or replacing existing processes. There is an old business adage that says change or you die. Some business practices are sound and may not be able to change immediately but some can and should be changed. One, however, must never stop looking at new ideas as insinuated by recent comments. In one example from my personal experience, it took years for one of our processes to change when technology finally caught up to make it happen. The point being we never stopped looking for a solution and a better way. Wallingford needs to do the same. New ideas are the lifeblood of any organization.

Jared Liu and several newcomers with outstanding backgrounds will be seeking office in November. They will bring a needed quality to bear in generating new and exciting ideas and will have the ability to examine existing practices. Not every new idea will pan out.  Not everything will change and if change does come, it will likely be in small increments. 

Let's give some new ideas a fighting chance in Wallingford and most importantly, let's at the very least change the thinking from how things are done to how things might be done a bit better.  

Jeff Kohan, Wallingford


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