LETTERS:   Thinking outside the box on tolls, Meriden’s sports reunion dinner

LETTERS:   Thinking outside the box on tolls, Meriden’s sports reunion dinner



Outside the box

Editor:

It looks like tolls may come to Connecticut, if this occurs some thinking outside the box needs to happen. When the first dollar is collected from a toll the state portion of the gas tax should be removed entirely, not reduced. This would do three things, level the playing field for vehicles that use an alternate fuel and create better business environment for Connecticut as out of state drivers would fill up here, and make the public a little happier that at least one tax was being removed completely.

Don McLeod, Wallingford

A sporting event

Editor: 

The 38th annual Meriden Sports Reunion Dinner was held recently at the newly renovated Meriden Elks Club Hall. A capacity crowd was on hand to honor the two new “Sportsmen of Distinction,” Judge Donald Green and Marty Roberts, both very well deserving of this prestigious award!

Many thanks to Dinner Chairman Patsy Papandrea and his entire committee for a job well done in the months it took to plan this event. Thanks also to MC for the evening, TV personality Al Terzi, who kept the proceedings moving along smoothly and adding his quick wit to the event. To Record-Journal sport staffers Bryant Carpenter and Sean Krofssik, thank you for your  great coverage before, during, and after the dinner, much appreciated.

And last but not least, kudos to the Elks Club culinary staff for preparing a tasty prime rib dinner, enjoyed by all.

The proceeds from the dinner went to benefit the Meriden Boys and Girls Club and the Meriden Beat the Street Community Center. The Wint Filipeck Sr. Memorial Tennis Tournament matched the gifts from the Dinner.

Hope to see you all next year.

John A. Young, publicist, Meriden Sports Reunion

Support Senate Bill 1051

Editor:

I am a private agency home care worker. Senate Bill 1051 would help to establish changes in the private agency home-care industry that are very much needed. It would create training standards, helping to professionalize the home care workforce and improve the quality of care received by consumers.

I enjoy caring for others, and I currently care for people suffering from dementia. Developing a compassionate setting for these individuals creates a better quality of life for them. They are joyful for the simplest gestures, such as a taking a stroll outside, or getting a haircut at a barbershop.

I care for my clients as if they were my own family. But with some individuals, such as my dementia patients, there is no protection for me at times when they become physically or mentally hostile. This bill would begin the discussion about workplace safety, and give home-care workers the skills necessary to handle a population of consumers who often present a diversity of needs of care.

We all know the turnover rates in this industry are very high. But I love my job. However, I work endless hours every week at $10.25 per hour to make ends meet.

My line of work is prone to mental and physical stress. Without paid vacation benefits, taking time off to relax is nearly impossible. It would be great to be able to commit to one agency, one job.

This bill would provide the transparency necessary to address these issues and truly make home care a profession. SB 1051 is a much needed first step. 

Sherry Falsetti, Meriden


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