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Eric Vo Record-Journal
Habitat ReStore, 286 S. Colony Road in Wallingford will have its grand opening in September. Customers will be able to purchase gently used furniture, with the proceeds benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Greater New Haven. (Eric Vo/Record-Journal)

Purchases at ReStore benefit Habitat


WALLINGFORD — Customers can purchase gently used furniture and equipment at the new Habitat ReStore in town. The proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity of Greater New Haven.

The store, located in the Walgreens plaza at 286 S. Colony Road (Route 5), is currently in its “soft opening,” according to Jennifer Rook, director of development at Habitat for Humanity of Greater New Haven. During the summer, it is open on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Expanded hours are set to begin in September.

The Wallingford branch is the sixth Habitat ReStore in Connecticut. The other five are in Danbury, Cromwell, Putnam, Stratford and Waterford. The stores’ “proceeds are used to build homes, community and hope locally and around the world,” according to its website.

Habitat for Humanity signed a 7-year lease for the 7,000square-foot building, according to Lou Proto, of The Proto Group, a real estate business based out of North Haven. The building was once the location of a Salvation Army, according to Doreen DeSarro, the business recruiter at the town’s Economic Development Department.

“It’s a local store run by a lo­cal affiliate,” Rook said.

The store is set up to look like a typical furniture store, with couches, tables and appliances lined up throughout the room. All the items are actually gently used and were donated by area residents, Rook said. “We’re opening the store in order to bring in additional funds for home building,” she said.

The store’s opening has generated a lot of buzz among the town’s residents because it benefits a greater cause.

“It’s really a great use. What they do is they take donated items — some materials, furniture, sinks, toilets; things that people are no longer using that are normally discarded — and sell them,” DeSarro said. “That’s how Habitat for Humanity makes the money that it does to build homes for low income people.”

evo@record-journal.com (203) 317-2235 Twitter: @EricVoRJ



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