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Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy's devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood.
Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) In early morning darkness, a worker prepares heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) Freestyle skiing competitor Devin Logan performs a trick on a miniature ski slope erected in Times Square, during the U.S. Olympic Committee's event marking 100 days until the Sochi Games, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) Ice hockey player Julie Chu, center, greets the crowd alongside bobsled competitor Steve Holcomb, left, and Nordic combined competitor Billy Demong, right, at the opening of the U.S. Olympic Committee's event to mark 100 days until the Sochi Games, in Times Square, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) Helen Chan holds her daughter, Ila Paz, as they join babies celebrating their first birthdays - and  survival - at New York University’s Langone Medical Center Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013, a year after the hospital evacuated more 40 babies to safety on sleds at the height of Superstorm Sandy in New York. On the first anniversary of Sandy, the babies’ parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, New Jersey governor Chris Christie hugs a woman at a statewide prayer service held at The New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, N.J., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. Christie made a number of stops throughout the state commemorating the first anniversary of the powerful storm that tore through the state, leaving more than 340,000 homes either damaged or destroyed and 71 deaths in its wake.  (AP Photo/Eric Thayer, Pool) A large sign is seen in the front yard as Sharon O'Brien looks at her mail at her home in Union Beach, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. James O'Brien says they had to demolish their small second home after severe Superstorm Sandy damage, because they couldn't get assistance to make repairs.  Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) Volunteers work on the outside of the Superstorm Sandy- damaged home of John and Angela Ciangiotto in Union Beach, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans) John, center right, and wife Angela Ciangiotto, center left, stand with New Jersey First Lady Mary Pat Christie, center, as they look at a small memorial outside of their Superstorm Sandy- damaged home in Union Beach, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. The Ciangiotto's have lost a daughter and a grandson since last years storm. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) Volunteers work on a small memorial outside of the Superstorm Sandy- damaged home of John and Angela Ciangiotto in Union Beach, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. The Ciangiotto's have lost a daughter and a grandson since last years storm. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) Volunteers work on the outside of the Superstorm Sandy- damaged home of John and Angela Ciangiotto in Union Beach, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Resilience, recovery, grief on the anniversary of Sandy


NEW YORK — For some, it’s something to mark — a year of recovery and rebuilding since Superstorm Sandy walloped the region — homes that have been restored, pride in the resiliency of people and neighborhoods.

But for others, there’s still a long road ahead and much work to be done. And for those who lost loved ones, the grief remains.

Sandy came ashore on Oct. 29, 2012, sending floodwaters pouring across the densely populated barrier islands of Long Island and the Jersey shore. In New York City, the storm surge hit nearly 14 feet, swamping the city’s subway and commuter rail tunnels and knocking out power to the southern third of Manhattan.

The storm was blamed for at least 182 deaths in the U.S. — including 68 in New York and 71 in New Jersey — and property damage estimated at $65 billion.

Here is a look at anniversary observances through a series of vignettes detailing how people are commemorating the unprecedented storm:

~ ~ ~

At Meade’s bar in the South Street Seaport, a “lights out” Sandy party was planned for Tuesday night to observe the historic neighborhood’s recovery.

“The neighbohood’s been here hundreds of years,” said owner Lee Holin. “It’s not going anywhere.”

Still, Holin’s mood wasn’t festive.

“I don’t just want to be the bar that survived Sandy,” he said as street artist friend who goes by the nickname “NDA” painted a mural in a stairwell above an eye-level water mark on the wall left by flooding.

Meade’s bar gained a loyal following by being one of the first businesses to open after the storm. But storefronts that went dark for months are starting to get new retail tenants willing to pay higher rents and charging customers more — in his eyes, bad news for the diehard locals.

“They’re trying to turn this into the Meatpacking District,” he complained, referring to the expensive, uber trendy neighborhood on Manhattan’s west side.

~ ~ ~

Ken Mandelbaum remembered looking out of his Brooklyn apartment window at the lower part of Manhattan and not being able to see a single thing, Sandy’s surging waters causing massive power outages.

“It was completely dark, it was unreal,” he said Tuesday, joining a couple of dozen others at Brooklyn Bridge Park, where they held electric candles to mark the anniversary of Sandy’s landfall, a commemoration that was also being done in other parts of coastal New York City and along the New Jersey shore.

Mandelbaum and his wife, who live on the 12th floor off a building at the water’s edge, didn’t evacuate during Sandy and spent days without power, using the stairs to get up and down from their home to the street.

“There were 240 steps,” Susie Mandelbaum said. “I counted them.”

~ ~ ~

An accident of geography left Giuseppe and Innocenza Picheo of New Jersey with two properties to rebuild after Sandy: a primary home in Moonachie and a second home in Manahawkin on Long Beach Island. The Moonachie house had “never had a drop of water” in 43 years before Sandy, Giuseppe Picheo said Tuesday.

“Even now, I still think about it at night, before I go to sleep,” Innocenza Picheo said. “When I go downstairs to wash clothes, I still look around and think about the water rushing in.”

Giuseppe Picheo said he has been able to rebuild both properties and that volunteers from a local church group helped him clear debris and start to rebuild his Manahawkin home. But he knows others haven’t been as fortunate.

“I’m back to normal, but I feel very sorry for those who aren’t, especially now when you see all the images again,” he said.

~ ~ ~

A group of volunteers in neon orange T-shirts was busy at work outside a Freeport, Long Island, home on Tuesday afternoon, cutting pieces of tile and molding on power saws in the driveway and garage of the split-level ranch they were helping repair.

The volunteers are part of the Samaritan’s Purse organization, a charitable group founded by the Rev. Franklin Graham that helps with disaster relief throughout the country.

Samaritan’s Purse supervisor Kevin Vallas said volunteers have been on Long Island since the days immediately following Sandy. He said the group has rebuilt four homes and assisted with cleaning out and repairs on dozens of others, both in New York and New Jersey.

“I get my rewards in heaven. I’m a Christian,” explained David Ray, a married father of two from Chillicothe, Ohio. “We’re commanded to be the hands and feet of Jesus. What we’re showing people here is love.”

~ ~ ~

Beatrice Spagnuolo was one of 23 people on Staten Island who died when Superstorm Sandy struck a year ago.

The 79-year-old woman was killed when her Midland Beach home flooded.

On Tuesday, her son Vincent Spagnuolo joined about 200 others who marched on a Midland Beach boardwalk to honor the memory of those who died on Staten Island.

As bagpipers played “Amazing Grace,” Vincent Spagnuolo said he still hadn’t gotten over his mother’s death. Spagnuolo’s own Staten Island home was also destroyed when Sandy struck.

~ ~ ~

Myra Camacho’s home in the Rockaways still has no electricity.

She spent nearly two months after Sandy trying to survive in her frigid, powerless home with her boyfriend, Walter Negron.

“We wrapped ourselves in blankets. We ate out of the churches,” Negron said.

They moved out after Camacho had a heart attack. She moved in with relatives. He’s been staying elsewhere.

Their luck might be about to change. The couple spent Tuesday morning with an inspector from a nonprofit housing group, who told them he could help with the restoration. He estimated it would cost $15,000.

“He said, ‘Don’t worry about it. We’re going to take care of it,’” Camacho said. “I don’t know. We’ve heard things like this before. I’m hopeful.”

~ ~ ~

When Sandy darkened much of the city, some New Yorkers were only hours old. Others weren’t even born.

On Tuesday, babies filled a Manhattan hospital room to celebrate their first birthdays — and their survival. Their parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, “Happy birthday, dear babies.”

Kenneth Hulett III weighed only 2 pounds when emergency medical workers rushed him out of the New York Hospital intensive care unit and down the stairs while hooked up to an oxygen tank. His mother, Emily Blatt, says her faith sustained her as she was evacuated on an orange sled.

That day, more than 40 babies were safety moved from the hospital to other facilities.

~ ~ ~

Aiman Youssef found out the other day that one of his neighbors has been living in his own Staten Island garage.

He says many people in his shorefront neighborhood are still displaced or living in partially restored homes, often without basic facilities.

“A lot of people have moved out of the area,” Youssef said. “A lot of houses went into foreclosure.”

Some homeowners are still reluctant to accept help, Youssef said, while others have been stymied by bureaucracy. He pointed to a bungalow across the street from his property on Midland Avenue.

A woman is living there without heat despite a city program that was supposed to restore heat, electric and water service, he said.

“We were lower middle class,” Youssef said. “Now we’re poor.”



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