Readers’ Opinions, 6-1-2014

Family income

Editor:

I read a recent article online about annual welfare benefits available from each state (for a one adult and two children family). When federal benefits are included, Connecticut is the fourth-highest supplier of welfare benefits in the nation, with this “average family” receiving an annual income equal to $44,370 for a non-welfare family, which is approximately $22 per hour.

After reading this, I realized that the recent Connecticut minimum wage increase to $10 an hour is inadequate and completely unfair because it fails to consider total family income. I could be the sole supporter of my family, work two minimum-wage jobs, and still not earn as much as a welfare family is given. Shouldn’t I have a family income at least equal to that of a welfare family, regardless of what the minimum wage is?

It’s time for the state to abandon old concepts and adopt something that’s fair and equal for all state residents. A minimum family income should be the new standard, and the state should make up the difference between my earned family income and what is given to a welfare family.

Allen Banko, Wallingford

Inaccurate writer

Editor:

Letter-writer Bob Karlon of Wallingford (R-J, 5-20) remarked that President Lincoln was the cause of deaths for civil war casualties — Karlon implied that the war was about slavery and that President Lincoln was the reason for this tragic history.

Karlon is just not accurate. The war was fought to prevent secession by confederate states from the union. The abolishment of slavery was a result of the union victory, but was not the goal of the war. If Lincoln had taken a side, it would have surely led to a broken nation, and Lincoln — in his brilliance — managed to achieve keeping the country whole, despite this very wide divide over issues.

Karlon should check out the Gettysburg Address. Albert Einstein thought Lincoln to be the greatest man to have ever lived!

John Francis, Meriden

‘Tight ship’?

Editor:

This is in regard to a Meriden city council meeting, held in May, which was open to the public. I sat through this meeting and listened to council members David Lowell, Brian Daniels, Steven Iovanna and Kathy Battista make their remarks about Mayor Santos and his decision concerning Corporation Counsel Michael Quinn. A judge ruled and made the final decision, and yet that wasn’t enough. I then heard Lowell read a somewhat lengthy statement for Quinn’s defense.

When finished reading his information, he was told by another council member that his story had no bearing on this matter and was not justified (which I totally agree with). I think that councilman Daniels seems to be constantly critical of whatever the mayor does. Councilman Iovanna said he runs a “tight ship.” I wonder how funding two festivals and continued expenses for the linear trail is considered a “tight ship” at this time of poor economy. If and when the economy improves, then we can move forward. When City Manager Larry Kendzior was asked about a dollar figure concerning the Meals on Wheels program, he couldn’t answer.

I offer Santos my sincere congratulations for having received his Connecticut Veterans Wartime Service Medal.

Donald Kroeber, Meriden

Railroaded

Editor:

Senator Chris Murphy said on T.V. that he wants to repair the railroad (Metro-North, between New York and New Haven). I’m all for it, but my understanding is that he may want to add on gasoline taxes to help pay for railroad expenses.

Perhaps he doesn’t care about the high price of gasoline because it may be that taxpayers pay the gas bill for politicians. If so, please give us a break!

Paul Esposito, Meriden



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