The Wallingford Historic Preservation Trust Erects Two Signs to Designate Buildings on the National Register of Historic Places

The Wallingford Historic Preservation Trust Erects Two Signs to Designate Buildings on the National Register of Historic Places



  In early September, 2020 two new professional signs were installed by the Wallingford Historic Preservation Trust (WHPT) to commemorate its local houses on the National Register of Historic Places. Thanks to funding provided by the William G Pomeroy Foundation, the Franklin Johnson House and the Nehemiah Royce House will now be more easily recognized as historic sites.

Richard Straub, Tom Reinman and Paul Marias accomplished the digging of the post holes, pouring concrete and installing the posts and signs. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation's official list of historic places worthy of preservation. Both the Franklin Johnson House and the Nehemiah Royce House were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.

  The William G Pomeroy Foundation is committed to supporting the celebration and preservation of community history; and to raising awareness , supporting research and improving the quality of care for patients and their families who are facing a blood cancer diagnosis. The Pomeroy Foundation helps people to celebrate their community's history by providing grants to obtain signage in the form of roadside markers and plaques. They offer eight different marker programs, and since 2006 have funded over 1100 signs across the US. Visit http://www.wpgfoundation.org.

  The Franklin Johnson House at 153 South Main St., was built in 1866 and is one of two authentic house museums in Wallingford where folks can take a walk back in the lives of their ancestors.

  It is also recognized as the Silver Museum at the Johnson House, as it is the guardian of a large silver collection from the early days of the silver industry in Wallingford and Meriden.

  The Nehemiah Royce House was built in 1672, just two years after Wallingford was settled. It remained in the Royce family until 1866. Fifty eight years later, it was bought by Royce descendants, Lucy and Helen Royce, who moved it from 499 North Main St., to its current location at 538 North Main St.

  Both museums are currently closed due to Covid 19. Reopening is expected in 2021. However, private tours can be arranged for groups of four or less. Please check our website at walllingfordcthistory.org or call the Trust at 203-265-4025. You can also email us at wallingfordcthistory@gmail.com.

  "We are grateful to the Pomeroy Foundation for their grant funding these signs," said Jerry Farrell Jr., President of the WHPT. "There is no question that special signage denoting the historic nature of these two properties, their status on the National Register of Historic Places, and their special place in our community memory helps our efforts to preserve Wallingford's history," Farrell said.


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