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$2.6 million roof replacement project at Southington High School to go to referendum

$2.6 million roof replacement project at Southington High School to go to referendum



reporter photo

SOUTHINGTON — Education officials say a portion of the Southington High School roof is in need of replacement, a $2.6 million project that goes to referendum in November.

The Town Council voted unanimously on Tuesday in favor of a bond ordinance for the funding pending approval by town voters.

Peter Romano, school operations director, said 71,000 square feet of the high school’s roof was installed 30 years ago. The roof is built to last about 20 years.

“We’ve gotten an additional 10 years out of it. We’ve pushed it to its limit,” Romano said.

The PVC roof has sprung some leaks, which Romano said have been addressed. But once leaks start appearing, they’ll only get more frequent.

“If you look in the ceiling tiles in areas of the school, you can see the stains,” he said. “A PVC roof is like a pool liner. Once you start getting holes, you start to see holes everywhere.”

Before the vote, council vice chairwoman Dawn Miceli asked if the school district has considered solar power on the new portion of the roof.

Romano and Town Manager Mark Sciota said they’d wait for the referendum outcome in November but would look into the possibility.

“Once we have a new roof on there, it’s definitely open for opportunities,” Romano said. “It’d be ripe for that.”

If the bonding is approved, Romano said the work would be bid in the winter, a good time to solicit roof work. The roof would be replaced next summer.

The state currently reimburses such work at 54 percent, but the rate does change. Romano said there’s no way to tell where the rate might be next year.

“You just don’t know what’s going to happen with the state climate,” he said.

jbuchanan@record-journal.com
203-317-2230

Twitter: @JBuchananRJ


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