EDITORIAL: Shelters bear brunt of pet surrender



While people adopt pets for the holidays, they also give them up. Word from a recent Record-Journal story indicates pet surrenders have been on the rise, with animal shelters full and bearing the brunt.

Karen Annis, of the Meriden Humane Society, told the R-J “we’ve just gotten a lot of unexpected surrenders where people will literally dump animals. Unfortunately there’s not really a better way to say that … we do our best to accommodate the animals that are in danger.”

Her statement sums up the dilemma: Too full, but the only place left when there’s no place to go. The holiday season may lead to an increase in adoptions but the wait list, and it’s a long one according to shelter workers, is of those who’ve applied to surrender an animal.

“I work in the office and we get phone calls literally every single day from multiple people calling and they just want to drop off the animals,” said Julie Rogers, staff and volunteer supervisor.

There are different reasons leading someone to give up an animal. Sometimes it’s because a person is no longer able to care for a pet, or people are moving and the pet can’t come along. Financial pressures can also certainly be an influence.

People should take pet adoption very seriously, of course. Pets can be an unwise gift, and Annis told the R-J’s Jessica Simms the humane society will not allow an adoption if it’s for a surprise holiday gift.

The shelter is obviously in need of support, and there are several ways those interested can help, including volunteering and donating. Details are available by visiting meridenhumanesocietyrescue.com. Rogers said even just spreading the word is helpful, “because you never know which person you’re going to reach that might be able to adopt an animal.”

Here’s to spreading the word.

 

 

 



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