Readers’ Opinions, 7-18-2014

Readers’ Opinions, 7-18-2014



An arbitrary ban

Editor:

It is encouraging to see the Record-Journal recognize the significant ongoing economic contribution of firearms manufacturers to Connecticut’s economy and acknowledge that business uncertainty has been introduced as the result of action by state government (R-J editorial, 7-14).

We have never received such acknowledgment from Gov. Malloy’s administration nor from the leadership of the General Assembly that passed complicated legislation and rushed it through before members could carefully read it. This legislation did nothing to improve public safety in our state, despite what you may hear from some in Hartford, but it has had a negative effect on Connecticut’s industry and employment.

For now, Stag Arms is not moving, but we have lost business from law-abiding Americans outside Connecticut who will not purchase firearms made in a state where elected officials show little respect for their own manufacturers or for the Second Amendment.

It has been widely reported that PTR Industries moved all its operations and 50 jobs from Bristol to South Carolina, where an appreciative governor cut the ribbon to a new facility. North Haven-based O.F. Mossberg & Sons made the decision to expand production in its Texas plant, not here.

Finally, there is nothing more “high-powered” about the Stag Arms rifles semi-automatic now banned in Connecticut. They may look “military,” but they differ only in appearance from many other rifles that fire the same or higher caliber cartridges and that can still be acquired legally in this state. We do make a rifle chambered in .22LR, a smaller cartridge to which your editorial refers, but it could never take the place of our now illegal models as a choice for many law-abiding gun owners, including many law enforcement officers in this state who privately purchased my company’s rifles — some right before the arbitrary state ban went into effect.

Mark Malkowski, New Britain

Fed up

Editor:

As a concerned, voting citizen of Meriden, I am fed up with the personal attacks on Mayor Manny Santos. One has only to look back over the past few months to see that City Councilor Brian Daniels has not stopped his negative misconceptions about Santos. I think that he constantly puts out his own egocentric opinions instead of fact. I normally laugh to myself when I see his tongue wagging, but I believe he stepped over the line this time when he brought a councilor’s wife into his verbiage (see R-J letters, 7-13). It’s time for this opportunistic councilor to either sit down or resign. The voters of our great city won’t be fooled by him next election. I believe that not only will Santos be re-elected, but that he will also be given the team he needs to create a positive future for all our citizens.

Jim Belote, Meriden

Vote them out!

Editor:

As usual, the Meriden Democrat-controlled city council doesn’t care about taxpayers, by voting to give Corporation Council Michael Quinn a blank check to pay for an appeal he will most likely lose. Rarely do judges overrule another. I believe that his appeal could cost several hundred thousand dollars.

A recently passed budget had cuts and yet another tax increase; this money should have been used for police, fire, sidewalks or the clock above city hall.

I personally have nothing against Quinn, but he should pay his own bills, just like he said he would.

Also, I’m glad the Republicans didn’t allow Councilor Kevin Scarpati to attend their last caucus. In 2011, Scarpati was elected as a Republican, but this year he became a turncoat and sided with the Democrats on issues costing taxpayers more money. The right thing to do is for Scarpati to resign, or for the Republican Party kick him out. Either way, I will be joining many others and will not vote for Scarpati or any Democrat again.

Irene Welskopp, Meriden


Advertisement

Read more articles like this and help support local journalism by subscribing to the Record Journal.

Unlimited Digital Access just 99¢

Read more articles like this by subscribing to the Record Journal.

Unlimited Digital Access for just 99¢

Latest Videos